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will discuss a national school choice week and the education options available to students across the country. first, we want about what's coming up on c-span2 and c- span3. 3's an2's booktv and c-span american history take -- american history tv ticket to santa fe, new mexico. that is coming up at noon -- a visit to local literary landmarks, interviews with authors from the area. here is a clip from santa fe writer james morris as he talks about joseph pulitzer and his book. >> i am james mcgrath morris. behind me stand some early printing presses. this seemed like a perfect place to talk about the man who revolutionized american newspapers. what i for started working on the book, people would react with recognition when i was writing about joseph pulitzer. it was clear from their expressions of anger about the name and not anything about his life. he shares his fate with alfred nobel, which is being well known for prize, but not well known for what he did in his life. alfred nobel was an explosive munitions maker. few people understand the significant role joseph pulitzer played in american
trained people in the war zone and educational where, that you lack the capability to have well-trained individuals that you can deploy elsewhere. and that creates a real readiness crisis for us. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you. >> thank you very much, senator. senator bloomen that is next. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to join my colleagues in thanking you, secretary panetta for your extraordinary service to our nation, and the personal sober and time that you are have devoted to all of us on the panel and other members of the congress. general dempsey, thank you as well for your service. and to both of you for your forthright and credible and significant testimony today explaining some answers to questions that are painful, i think, for all of us, and i know for you having attended the services and ceremonies in honor of these brave patriots and heroes, as you call them, and also your knowledge personally of them. and i'm struck as senator senator kaine was by the provocative i would prefer to call it powerful statement you offered regarding the effect on the nati
of the healthcare spending. that is an important point. >> let's switch to another passionate topic. education. quite a few questions from the audience on how much can we afford to fund and where should we be funding and investing in the educational system? should it be done on a national level or a state level? >> let's mix it up, you go first. >> i have read that test scores of american elementary and secondary educational students have not increased and the famous nation at risk report in the early 1980's. even though spending has increased dramatically. i question whether the solution to the problem is, let's take those systems and pour money into it are. it's hard to argue against earning more money, that and possibly hurt. but you basically have major structural flaws in the way the system is organized. it is not producing the results that we need. i strongly believe that -- i would say, after entitlement spending, i would put the quality of our educational outcomes as the greatest long-term threat to america's economic strength. it is the most important thing, and it has to do with stru
degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. trying to find a better job can likbe frustrating.gs, so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male
encourage people who get educated in the united states, in colleges or working with universities, key people in the united states, not encourage companies and people to go back to the home countries. so this issue has recently become an issue fo for deloitte. you know, we've looked at this from a broad prison for a while, but like other companies, microsoft, oracle, the high-tech compass, into, a lot of companies and services companies, you know, this is a recent thing given some of the challenge we've had to actually hire and maintain and fill needs. so as an intro statistic, we hire every year about 7000 employees, 7000 people out of colleges and universities. and that's still not enough to be able to fill the needs of our clients, given a tradition and turnover and things of that nature. sort of streamlined the process. we all know about the backlogs that exist right now and how long it actually takes from beginning to end, and the timing of that and how quickly we can get people deploy to our clients to help them come again like i said before, solve that problem and innovate, which also
of state boards of accountancy to provide continuing professional education, credits for accounting professional. so we are quite excited of that and hopefully you will as well. this accreditation highlights the value of this and other programs that would hold her at the chamber. for more information on that please visit our website, or speak to some of folks outside in the registration desk. after the video i'm going to ask marty to come up directly and begin the program the first award from our sponsor, the gfi group. >> good morning. gfi group is delighted to continue its support of the national chamber foundation's quarterly economic briefing. the goal is to affect the impact of public policy on u.s. bases and the global economy. gfi group is an american company headquartered in new york city with shares trade on the new stock exchange. gfi employs close to 2000 people and over a dozen offices and most of the world's major financial centers. as you meet us when gfi employs are hard at work around the globe and here in new york and executing billions of dollars in transactions ac
is the foundation of your case and you have to go in there and do that to educate the jury and to educate the judge. a lot of these people and the judge have never been in front and had to deal with a gravanis type case. the information should be consistent. you have defense attorneys that start going through 2 or 3 our 4 cases and they hear the same thing and they hear somebody professing to be an expert and this guy does not know, it puts a big hole in his expertise right off so we wanted to have something consistent. now, if you properly present this information, it will easily establish the officer as a credible expert and at that point you can start rendering expert decisions. trainings that you go to should be set up in such a way that every jurisdiction has an expert. sometimes you have to piggyback on somebody else's expertise while you learn, but there's no reason that every jurisdiction can't have an expert in gravanis and that's going to come in handy when he's talking to city hall people about allocation of resources, to his department about allocation of resources, when he decides h
to me. she was great. she is articulate, very well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos. but the press would not give her the same accolades, the general media would not give for this and accolades, not because she was competent, but because of her political ideology. there is some dispute bi -- skewed bias rating hillary clinton for some of the wrong things. host: on twitter -- "the washington post" adds this as far as analysis of her time in office -- "many of clinton's successes appeared to be due largely to her personal popularity and famous work ethics, attributes that were on display in her final days in office." nevada. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. i think the only reason she ever had her job was because of her husband, bill. she did exactly what she has been told to do by the president's, and a lot of us are not on tune with president obama's schedule, especially this benghazi deal. whenever a person throws her hands up in the air and is not want to admit to any responsibility of a job done po
by kicking educated immigrants who create jobs for the rest of us out of the country. >> the united states has benefitted from the fact that capable people whether you call that smart or whatever word you use have wanted to come to the united states. so whether it's south america, asia, europe, we have been a magnet for talent. that's partly why with higher defense budget, medical budget why we can continue to be such an exemplar. partly why our universities are so strong. yet our immigration system makes it very hard for those people to come in. so, you know, if somebody is being offered a job here for over $100,000. there's other jobs created around that job. you don't want to discourage a company from having to put that job -- >> do we discourage them? >> absolutely. >> how? >> you can be a student at uc berkeley and get this wonderful education, microsoft offers use a job for over $100,000 a year and we have to say, if the country will keep you. most of those students are told they can't stay. get out of the united states. >> so, they take the education and go start a company somewhere
is actually through the pme, through the nco academy, through the officer sessions, education and training is teach men and women how to manage, um, some of the challenges that are going to come up related to gender, related to dating, related to rumors, related to concerns about if i push a woman, am i going to be accused of singling her out and harassing her, or am i then developing her and her skills? we can share the lessons that we've learned to make them more effective at it rather than leave each sort of man and woman to invent it themselves or figure it out themselves or learn through trial and error which we can potentially, um, lose out or wash out in other women. >> good. thank you, dr. miller. very insightful. i think we've heard a good discussion up to this point about the possibility of gender-neutral physical standards and how they would be implemented and enforced. the necessary role of leadership, continuing to build on changing the culture. i'd like to allow the, or give the audience an opportunity now to ask some questions. gayle, would you like to ask the first one? >>
on our education alert. first here's a look at the winning lottery numbers. >> now some good news for the u.s. economy. 170,000 jobs were added which revised the past year's numbers upward. >> despite the up tick in the unemployment rate the report was well received on wall street. the dow closed above 14,000 for the first time since october 2007 all three major indexes posted gains for a 5th straight week. >> there are thousands of people who don't mind admitting they really love their jobs. the school has been picked as one of the nation's top places to work. education reporter tim tyutin has the story. >> what does it take to become one of the top places to work in america. we were curious. we showed up at the community college in he is six to find out. >> employees are getting credit for bragging about where they work. the results showed up on a national survey from a company called workplace dynamics. >> doesn't surprise me. it's an excellent place to work. our benefits are second to none. we are like a family here. whenever you need anything done there's always someone here
with great education and great skills know their job security is fragile. as a way to protect yourself, people like to think that that could never happen to me. i am good enough that i would not lose my job or if i did, i would certainly be able to find something away. in some ways by turning on the unemployed and putting it on them, in some ways, there is a bizarre defense mechanism that makes people feel more secure about their own jobs in a fragile economy. i think there is a lot of complex factors going on here. it is certainly eroded very deeply in a complete misunderstanding of just how bad the economy and the recovery has been. host: what is the best way to protect these people? guest: is important for them to be honest and talk about why you lost your job and talk in detail -- if it was because the company went under or there were massive layoffs or the industry were working in started suffering -- talk in detail about all you have done to try to get re-employed. employers don't wish -- don't want to hire lazy people. people are out there actively looking. discuss the creative
and higher education cost and not just that but if we look back historically and we move from an agrarian society to an industrial society children are free work, right? you have seven kids and to work on a family farm and by the time the kids are 10 years old there is a helping hand. when you live in the city and working in factories and doing increasingly mechanized work children are not that help. they are simply a cost. this is one of those factors pushing us in that direction. now another big change is the nature of the welfare state. this is something which didn't exist in ninteenth-century 19thy ninteenth-century america. we were basically on our own. as we got older children to care of us in one of the basic reasons to have children. you have a gaggle of kids and you hope that one of them at least it's a good one and will look after you. and now we don't need to have that anymore. we have social security and medicare. it's still nice to have a child ... and to look at you as you begin to drool and watch more jeopardy but it's no longer necessary. all these little things and these
efforts to educate members of this committee and the public. we will resume the hearing. the gentleman from california is recognized without penalty for the loss of any of his five minutes for that destruction. >> can i get an extra minute for this one? >> may be. >> first of all. in several ways i want to associate myself with my good friend from illinois. i am one month, nine days older than you. that does not mean there is any real difference in us as baby boomers. we're going to exit the scene and i do not want to exit the scene without resolving an immigration problem that predated my interest and the gentleman's entrance into congress. that group of disruption did not understand my politics. i do believe we can get to unsubstantial if not complete immigration reform bill. it is my hope that this is that window of opportunity. i do have some concerns from earlier. i want to associate myself with ms. lofgren. i heard you say we should grow different crops in california as a resolution to the leading -- needing labor we cannot seem to find. is that pretty well correct? >> i am sayin
want to point out, which will be live it 10:00 a.m. on c-span3 is education secretary arne duncan talking about waivers for the "no child left behind" bill. on c- like a 10:00 a.m. span3. robert is on our republican line for seamless. should sequestration be allowed to go through? caller: hi. we were calling it the fiscal cliff. all the sudden it seems we have gone away from that and we are calling it sequestration. i thought that the whole term "fiscal cliff" came about because sequestration was part of that. the media keeps differentiating that now. host: you don't see a difference? caller: it is still sequestration, that is the fiscal cliff. that has not gone away. host: semantics aside, what would you like to see done? caller: just for the media to clarify we never really got anywhere except for slight increase in taxes on a small number of people. it was $450 million and above. how many people actually dropped checks of? ? host: $450 million? caller: $450,000. excuse me. i don't know anybody that's actually gets a check of that amount, or maybe a bonus. i don't know. nonethel
that i wanted to go to because i don't feel like you can be truly educated without having a choice. i think having a choice is kind of education. >> pelley: mayor landrieu also gave great credit to the teach for america program that sent 375 teachers from all over the country to new orleans. harvard said today that 60 of its students were forced to leave for cheating on a final exam. dozens of others were put on probation. it's been reported that basketball and football players were among the students disciplined. the n.f.l. wants to change the culture of the game to prevent injuries and we'll talk to james brown of cbs sports next. i gave birth to my daughter on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. [ tylenol bottle ] me too! and nasal congestion. [ tissue box ] he said nasal congestion. yeah...i heard him. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom night
education, training, energy and national security will cost us jobs it will slow down our recovery. it is not the right thing to do for the economy, it is not the right thing for folks that are out there still looking for work. the good news is this does not have to happen. for all the drama and disagreements we have had over the last few years, democrats and republicans have been able to come together and cut the deficit by more than $2.5 trillion through a mix of spending cuts and higher rates on taxes for the wealthy. a balanced approach has achieved more than $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction. that is more than halfway towards the $4 trillion in deficit reduction that economists and elected officials from both parties believe it is required to save our debt. i believe we can finish the job with a balanced mix of spending cuts and more tax reform. the proposals that i put forward during the fiscal cliff negotiations, and discussions with speaker boehner and others, are still very much on the table. i just want to repeat, do deals that i fell forward, the balanced approach of sp
like education and training, energy and national security will cost us jobs, and it will slow down our recovery. it's not the right thing to do for the economy. it's not the right thing for folks who are out there still looking for work. and the good news is this doesn't have to happen. for all the drama and disagreements that we've had over the past few years, democrats and republicans have still been able to come together and cut the deficit by more than $2.5 trillion through a mix of spending cuts and higher rates on taxes for the wealthy. a balanced approach has achieved more than $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction. that's more than halfway towards the $4 trillion in deficit reduction that economists and elected officials from both parties believe is required to stabilize our debt. so we've made progress. and i still believe that we can finish the job with a balanced mix of spending cuts and more tax reform. the proposals that i put forward during the fiscal cliff negotiations in discussions with speaker boehner and others are still very much on the table. i just want to repeat, th
educated for the 21st century economy. that means making investments in education. it means trying to address the situation where even as we have for 35 straight months in private sector job creation, we have for much of that time seen job loss in state and local governments. that is a portion of it. in education, schoolteachers, the president has put forward proposals. this is his highest priority. it is important to look at things like immigration reform. businesses have vocally and publicly, as an economic necessity -- the economic benefits of comprehensive immigration reform are manyfold and very important. that is the principal reason the president believes we need to come forward in a bipartisan way and get this done. there is every reason, both economic and otherwise, he to continue to make the progress that has been made, that we have seen. and get it done. get a bill passed that represents the consensus that is building who, he that reflects the principles that are shared by the bipartisan group in the senate, and make it law, make it a fact. >> are there any changes in th
to reach out to the industry to come up with a way to really promote financial literacy and education before college level, getting into high schools so that we have an educated group of young folks who come out and understand about the importance of having a financial house in order, the importance of having a good credit history, the understanding what it means to be smart about using credit. >> you can watch that entire conversation with the chamber of commerce this afternoon right after the farewell ceremony for secretary of defense leon panetta, which is expected to start at about 3:45 p.m. eastern, and next tuesday night, president obama delivering his fourth state of the union address to a joint session of congress. it includes the president's speech at 9:00 and the republican response from florida senator marco rubio. that will be on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org >> first lady helen taft on discussing politics. >> i always had the satisfaction of knowing almost as much as he about the politics and intricacies of any situation. i think any woman can discuss with her husb
that a challenge and transform the fields of biotechnology, genomics, personalized medicine and science education. [applause] >> barry c. mazur. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of science to barry c. mazur, harvard university, the original and landmark contributions to differential policy, number theory, algebraic geometry where him and other applications his work was fundamental to wild proof of fairmont theorem and for his dedication to communicating subtle mathematical ideas to the broader public. [applause] >> lucy shapiro. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of science to lucy shapiro, stanford university, for the pioneering discoveries in bacterial cell controlled by an integrated genetic circuit functioning in time and space that serves as a systems engineering paradigm underlying cell differentiation and ultimately the generation of diversity in all organisms. [applause] >> anne m. treisman. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of science to anne m. treisman, princeton university, for a 50 year career of penetrating originality and depth that has led to the understanding of fundamental limit
with the clipper. we may get a trace to an inch. in grant county the union education complex, they're two hours late. union education complex, two hours late. around here your day planner we start out fine. it's cold. increasing clouds this afternoon. we get into the mid-30s, enough early sun could push us 38, even 40 south of town. by this evening if not late afternoon, we've got some more light snow showers, flurries flying around. not expecting much from this. a trace to potentially an inch of snow out there before it's all double. that would be well -- all done. that would be well to our north. this is from last night. there go the snow showers. lots of them but they didn't amount to much. there's an area near chicago that we'll watch as it comes across ohio and the west virginia that will get the mountains but will give us more conversational snow, just a dusting. 23 in rockville. round hill is 24 in western loudoun county. waldorf 25 along with north beach there in northern calvert and here in d.c. boy, we're looking at a pretty good sky this morning on our michael & son weather camera. a
is a lobby group that "aims to inform and educate policymakers, consumers, and the media about the penny's economic, cultural, and historical significance." that's right, historical significance. for instance: did you know, historians tell us there was a time when pennies were useful. [laughter] and americans for common sense backs everything up with science evidence, like a recent poll which showed that "almost two-thirds of americans still feel the penny should be retained." and you can trust that poll, because it was conducted by leading opinion researchers coinstar. [laughter] of course. [ laughter ] coinstar, clearly impartial. they don't care if the government got rid of all change. there are still plenty of metal disks for them to count. who doesn't want to know how many washers you have in your pocket? [laughter] of course, cynics say americans for common cents can't be trusted just because "they are run by the main lobbyist representing the zinc industry, which supplies most of the metal used in pennies." [laughter] turns out pennies are mostly zinc. that's why whenever i feel a
the background check, pay back taxes, pay the fine, or gotten an education, served in the military i got into the back of a very long line -- could you comment, mayor castro, on those possible compromise alternatives and what seems to be most consistent with who we are? >> i believe you laid it out well in the extremes you have. mass deeper tissue up 11 million million people, that will not happen. we will not open up the borders. the bipartisan proposal and the president's proposal represents an effective compromise. this is our earned citizenship. the alternative is a recipe for creating a class of second class, noncitizens of the united states. >> thank you. >> last but not least, the gentleman from georgia is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you. one of the good things about being last is that you get to listen and hear a lot of questions and your a lot of hyperbole -- hear a lot of hyperbole. i have heard a lot of discussion and a lot of well what if we don't do this it will be horrific. i come from northeast georgia. mary agricultural district. it is on the border of atlanta.
about the issues not by disrupting efforts to educate the members of this committee and the public and we will resume the hearing at the gentleman of california is recognized for that penalty for the five minutes for the disruption. >> could i get an extra minute for this month? [laughter] >> mabey. in several ways i want to associate myself with my good friend from illinois. i'm one of, 90 is older than you but that doesn't mean there is any difference in the baby boomers. we are going to enter the same. the immigration problems that predated my entrance and the gentleman's entrance into commerce. that group of disruptions really didn't understand my politics. we can get to a substantial if not complete immigration reform bill cuyahoga for 12 years of the committee of trying to get their it is my fervent hope this is that window of opportunity. i do have some concerns from earlier today i want to associate myself. i heard you say basically we should grow different crops in california as a resolution to leading labor that we can't seem to find. is that pretty well correct? >> no, w
are important, education and infrastructure of the health and human service needs. so medicaid will need to have some flexibility, much of the software going to watch as we go forward. let me just finish by ending where i started. we need to address the rising cost of health care. i do think the affordable care act does that. i think we provided an opportunity with our health care exchange in utah as a model based on good principles that allows businesses to continue to provide the benefit and help with competitive forces and consumer control to, in fact, have an impact on the rising cost of health care. it may be imperfect but it's a step i think in the right direction. again, the fundamental position that i'm taking and we are taking in utah is free market works if we allow but it takes politicians like myself and others out there to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so anxious to fix a problem that we don't let the marketplace make the adjustments that are necessary to get the right outcome. and again as i said, if we want the best quality product,
that year as well so we focus on educating schools on litter pick-up in the city. in 2008 the program was expanded to include graffiti and 2008 was when our by law was amended requiringing property owners it remove graffiti from their property or face a $250 crime. the one success from our program was the council at that time looked at the idea that we can't hold citizens responsible if we're not responsible ourselves, so they created our management program at that time. that includes bylaw enforcement as well as civic clean up and support for property owners. the program expanded again in 2009 to include a cigarette litter reduction program. we have a huge problem in our city with cigarette litter. we found that through our litter audits that we have done, we have a higher rate of cigarette litter in our cities compared to other cities in canada. expanded again in 2010 to include needle disposal and i said in the other session, this is what i am escaping from in edmonton right now. yay, san francisco. so we have a snow angel program where we ask citizens to voluntarily shovel t
, the american council on education will announce they recommend degree credit for five undergraduate courses offered by a palo alto-based company. the courts are free but students need to pay between $100 and $1930 to get credit for the class. they offer online classes from leading universities including stanford and duke. >> record numbers of people are buying homes with cash. it is changing the way homes are sold in the bay area. state-wide, 146,000 homes were purchased with no financing last year. in the bay area that is 26,000 homes and that makes it tough for some buyers whose higher offer could be rejected in favor of cash. >> selling agent told us we had the higher overall offer without they accepted an all cash offer because it was close enough and they want add quick close and all that. >> it is not just first time buyers in the $400,000 range but affects the $1.5 million and $2 million range. >> it used to be downsizing empty nesters who paid cash but now others are cashing out stock options. >> tee off is 8:00 a.m. in pebble beach national pro-am. yesterday a few of the more well-
. and on c-span3 tonight education secretary arne duncan discusses the no child left behind law, and the obama administration's waiver process. all these events are tonight beginning at 8 p.m. eastern on the c-span networks. >> having observed a steady improvement and the opportunities and well being of our citizens, i can report to you, the state of this old but useful union is good. >> once again, in keeping with time-honored tradition i've come to report to you on the state of the union. and i'm pleased to report that america is much improved, and there's good reason to believe that improvement will continue for the data,. >> my duty tonight is to report on the state of the union, not the state of our government, but of our american community. and to set forth our responsibilities in the words of our founders, perform -- to form a more perfect union. the state of the union is strong. >> as we gather tonight, our nation is at war. our economy is in recession, and the civilized world faces unprecedented dangers. yet, t yet the state of our union has never been stronger. >> it's
's hard to track which districts break the rules. recently whistleblowers led the department of education to order eight districts to repay $170 million to the subsidized meal program. the senate report found the districts were all cash strapped and diverted the money to employee salaries and other expenses. today officials revealed the first comprehensive national plan to protect student/athletes. the proposal calls for athletes to have better access to health care professionals and more up-to-date equipment. only 42% have access to athletic trainers and almost half of the schools come up short on the federally recommended nurse to student ratio. many schools agree with the proposal, most schools worry about finding the money to implement the changes. >>> after years of speculation, it appears it's finally happening. the u.s. postal service plans on canceling saturday meal delivery. >> mail delivery will occur monday through friday. we will not deliver nor collect mail on saturday. >> the postmaster general says it will save the cash strapped agency about $2 billion a year. starting in a
to fund our research, education advocacy and patient service. >> reporter: he got involved his freshman year as a team captain. by sophomore he was running the event. >> it's a unifying sense, a great feeling on campus to have everyone bond together to fight cancer. >> reporter: today, the burlingame high school relay for life is the largest student- run event of its kind in the state. in the last four years, they have raised nearly a quarter of a million dollars for the american cancer society. >> zach stands out because he is not doing it for himself. he is not doing it for a resume'. he's passionate about what he wants to do. he wants to truly make a change in this world. >> reporter: steve mills is director of student activities at burlingame high. >> ever since he stepped foot on this campus he's made a huge impact. >> reporter: his work with the american cancer society isn't limited to just his school. he is the lead high school volunteer for the state training other students to put on relays at over 60 campuses across california. >>
. a platform he uses to educate other players about transitioning to life after football. as well as the dangers of injuries you cannot really see. repeated hits to the head. >> the perception of what a concussion was was different. i don't think we thought that you had a concussion until you were new yorked out on the field. and we looked at it as beige of honor. >> as a player he didn't know that concussions can cause serious injury to the brain. now campbell says playing football takes years off a player's life. >> cramps all over my body and headaches and migraines. >> he says he's also suffered some memory loss. >> there were situations where i don't remember a certain series. like i would be out there and not realize exactly what was going on. >> while he was never diagnosed, looking back, campbell believes he's had over ten concussions in his football career. and he believes players today need to recognize the symptoms and be willing to let their brains heal. a year ago, he considered donating his brain for research in chronic traumatic encephalopathy or cte, a degenerative
. so -- my niece will go back to the institution that they presume to call educational and she'll be persecuted no longer. >> you have got the southern gentleman down. >> a good, interesting character. >> a character written specifically for you. the movie and the novelist had a picture of you taped to the computers when they're writing the book. >> is that a compliment? i don't know. i'm never sure. >> what made them see you as the ultimate magical recluse? >> i have no idea. i have no idea. >> when you were taping, i heard this is some kind of a witches' tale. i don't know if witch is the right word. >> it's more love story. it's a supernatural story. at the base, the center, it's about two young people who are in love and with all the pressures that surround them. >> this is your niece. in some ways, a love story about dad and his daughter. >> absolutely. man trying to protect, as i think every father will understand the character. >> there was some kind of a supernatural occurrence while you were taping. >> i don't remember that. >> i heard something supernatural happened o
cause. a gunman fatally shot 20 first graders and six educators before killing himself in newtown's sandy hook elementary school in december. the school district's superintendent says the timing of the film crew's visit is "poor". r in world news, mexico's attorney general says the explosion that killed more than three dozen people at the headquarters of the country's state-run oil company was caused by natural gas. investigators say gas built up in the basement of the pemex building and was likely sparked by an electrical fault. 37 people were killed and dozens more injured in the explosion which collapsed several floors of the building last thursday afternoon. we will take a break. this live look. that temperatures in the city right after 48 [ m [ale announcer ] when heit comes to the financianal obstacles milimitary families face, w e understand. ou r financial advice is igeared specifically to cuo rrenten and former mily membemrs and their families. [ laughaus ] dad! ! dad!ad [ applappuse ] [ mal me announcer ] life br ings obstacles. usaua brings retirement adv. call
in our popular culture. >> it's the type of art that you don't have to have an art education to understand it. it makes you feel good when you look at it. it's fun. >> reporter: it is fun. it's sentimental and everybody responds to it. >> reporter: everybody from presidents to the beatles. do you work this quickly? >> i do. reporter: born and raised in new york, fasino went to art school in the late 1970s. he was inspired by whimsical artists and soon developed his own signature look. >> the process really comes from, you know, doodles as a child. and then i love pop-out books. and a little bit of print making in school. everything came together. >> reporter: while no subject is too big, even the whole world to fasino it's the small disails that matter. do people who have your work say, i discovered something new, charles? i've never seen this before? >> always. people say they've had pieces of art work on their wall for 20 years and they're amazed that they never saw this or never saw that. >> reporter: for the super bowl, all of those 3-d details begin with a simple sketch.
. they need to go much farther: in my opinion. anyone with a high level of education, mathematics, engineering, science, and so on. this should not be complicated for anybody. dagen: it did get complicated. they wanted to come up with a way that people can come and go legally in this country in the guineans do not like that. they guineans do not want additional workers coming to this country. [talking over each other] lou: one of the big problems is they signed on board against their own membership. they have been supporting illegal immigration and amnesty at any price. most of the illegal immigrants coming into this country are uneducated. they are low skilled workers. it is a limited role and limited number. we have to go beyond the nonsense here. there is an teleological divide. the ceos who are trying to get cheap labor in many instances. they have done so for the past 20 years. we have got to talk about this in terms of national interest. it is to resolve this issue for the purpose of our goals as a nation. not because of the nonsense that is introduced by various senators or congressmen
's education that aren't in your own family but you can't afford to send your own kids to school. california is like france. the only people who are rich are the people who inherited the money. it is hard to build fresh wealth there unless you have discovered something really great that works on the internet. stuart: i think you just made the highlight reel. you are the highlight reel. charles: thank you. stuart: perhaps the state in the worst financial shape of all of them is illinois. remember, it just cancelled a 500 million dollars bond auction because it couldn't afford the high interest rates that were demanded. in state worker pensions alone, it's 96 billion dollars -- it has 96 billion dollars worth of unfunded liability. it's in the red, big-time. and because of that, standard and poors downgraded the state's debt. giving it the worst credit rating of all the 50 states. joining us now is illinois state treasurer, and dan is with us from illinois. welcome to the program. good to have you with us, sir. >> thank you very much, it's good to be back on with you, stuart. stuart: i have to
that money to do something positive to get guns out of the wrong hands and encourage, like education. go around to schools. get all of these people in the nra, go to schools and talk to the kids who are -- i live near columbus ohio. and every morning i wake up and i turn on the news and there was at least -- at least one shooting overnight. >> stephanie: right. >> uh-huh. >> caller: and a lot of it is done by kids who have nothing better to -- excuse me -- >> stephanie: oh pardon me. >> caller: nothing better to do than to go around and mug people, rob people -- columbus is turning into a real hell hole, and i'm afraid to go out. i don't even live in columbus anymore. and i live in the middle of nowhere. i live in the middle of a horse pasture in a trailer. and i'm not afraid of the hunters, but these kids are coming into the country now. and the nra needs to put their money to good use and help get the guns out of the gangs. >> stephanie: yes. adam schiff wrote a piece about it really is stunning some of the stuff that you don't even realize that we give gun manuf
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